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My dog is also in a Picture

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Little Charlie Fox.

Aka High Maintenance

Little Charlie fox

 

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Bring your dog into the picture!

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Dog owner Rafael Mantesso creates awesome illustrations featuring his Bull Terrier.
Hilarity ensues.

 

BT 2

 

BT4

 

BT1

 

BT3

What does FUK stand for?

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If Scotland gains its independence in the forthcoming referendum, the remainder of the United Kingdom will be known as the “Former United Kingdom” …….or F.U.K.

So in a bid to discourage the Scots from voting ‘yes’ in the referendum, the Government has now begun to campaign with the slogan “Vote NO, for F.U.K’s sake”.

RBS

Do you still remember

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Maslow’s hierarchy of needs?

This is what is used to be

Maslow's_hierarchy_of_needs.svg

 

And this is the updated version

Maslow_n

 

(from I Fuckin Love Science)

 

Maslow’s hierarchy of needs is a theory in psychology proposed by Abraham Maslow in his 1943 paper “A Theory of Human Motivation” in Psychological Review.[2] Maslow subsequently extended the idea to include his observations of humans’ innate curiosity. His theories parallel many other theories of human developmental psychology, some of which focus on describing the stages of growth in humans. Maslow used the terms Physiological, Safety, Belongingness and Love, Esteem, Self-Actualization and Self-Transcendence needs to describe the pattern that human motivations generally move through.

Maslow studied what he called exemplary people such as Albert Einstein, Jane Addams, Eleanor Roosevelt, and Frederick Douglass rather than mentally ill or neurotic people, writing that “the study of crippled, stunted, immature, and unhealthy specimens can yield only a cripple psychology and a cripple philosophy.”[3] Maslow studied the healthiest 1% of the college student population.[4]

Maslow’s theory was fully expressed in his 1954 book Motivation and Personality.[5] While the hierarchy remains a very popular framework in sociology research, management training[6] andsecondary and higher psychology instruction, it has largely been supplanted by attachment theory in graduate and clinical psychology and psychiatry.[7][8]

 

 

Judging People

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http://time.com/3221995/character-values-judge/

 

Amusing ? article. Yes we do judge people although we like to deny it. But how and according to what?

 

The following remark  I found interesting and I can relate to (some of) this

Social media. Quote!

I learn more about people I have known my whole life long on Facebook / blogs than I have pieced together over the entire length of our relationship. When someone writes, it becomes relatively easy to see what their angle is. Are they an attention whore? Do they self promote? Do they reciprocate when people interact with them and their content? What are their photographs like? Are they all selfies? Do they hide their spouse and family from the world in order to appear ‘available’? Do they go out of their way to hide how they really look? Do they just play mindless games all day? Do they share popular content in order to get praised?

This does not work if they do not write online, or if they only use social media sparingly, but reading someone’s words is a way straight into their personality if you care to pay attention.

I have also found a vast difference – generally speaking – between my English and Afrikaans friends. Also with what type of food they eat. But I suppose this is cultural? Or what?

 

Einstein